C | Beef 1.2KG

C | Beef 1.2KG

Classic Beef – This is one of our most popular meats with both cats and dogs.

These cubes of beef do not include any bone or organ content so you will have to add them to provide your pet with a balanced diet.  Eg. every 100g of food should be made up of 80% meat, 10% bone & 10% organ.

12 x 100g cubes

Suitable for cats & dogs, kittens & puppies

Additive-Free – Grain-Free  – Preservative Free

 

 

This product cannot be bought individually. Please visit Variety Meat Boxes to purchase.

Description

Beef is a nutrient-dense food. It provides good quality protein, the vital minerals iron and zinc, and the ‘B’ group vitamins B12, B1, B2, B3 & B6.

B Vitamins:
This group of water-soluble vitamins includes B1, thiamine, B2 riboflavin, niacin, and others. They each work to regulate the cell-making processes within the body. Normally they are produced naturally, but occasionally – when a dog has been receiving antibiotics, for instance – it may need to have its levels topped up.

Protein:
Protein is needed to build, repair and maintain body tissues, organs, and cells in all parts of the body. Proteins are complex molecules and are made up of different combinations of smaller units called amino acids. Protein is necessary to build a strong, muscular body.

Recommended feeding:

  • For Dogs: 100 grams (one cube) per 5Kg body weight per day for adult dogs per day.
  • For Puppies & Kittens:  Up to 12 months of age adjust up to approx. 200g per 5Kg per day.
  • Cats:  Approx. 100g per day

Every pet is unique and has different nutritional requirements, adjust feeding levels according to the activity levels and condition of your pet.

Keep frozen. Once thawed use within three days.

HINT:  

Cats like their meat blends at room temperature (“blood temperature”).  If meat blends are cold, add some boiled water to “warm” the meat.

Cats get their liquid from their meat, not usually from the water bowl.

Older cats need animal protein, not more carbohydrates, and fats.  http://feline-nutrition.org/nutrition/the-skinny-on-senior-cats-metabolism-explained.